SIPTU representatives are calling for immediate and significant government action to support the aviation sector following the announcement today (Saturday, 12th June) that Aer Lingus Regional is cancelling all flights. The cancellation follows the ceasing of operations by Stobart Air, which has resulted in its cancelling of its franchise agreement with Aer Lingus to operate regional air routes within Ireland.

Over the last year, SIPTU representatives have made repeated calls for significant support to be provided to the aviation sector and its workforce.

SIPTU Sector Organiser, Neil McGowan, said: “The decision by Stobart Air to cease operations is the latest blow to the aviation industry and airports in Ireland. The move has put hundreds of jobs at immediate risk.

“Aer Lingus Regional through its franchise agreement with Stobart Air operated the Public Service Obligation (PSO) routes from Dublin to Kerry Airport and Donegal Airport. These routes are of vital importance to these regional airports. It is crucial that these PSO routes are maintained and the Government takes immediate steps to restore these services.

He added: “The restrictions in place in relation to air…


SIPTU is supporting plans for the regeneration of Dublin’s Moore Street area, and has called on members to support the campaign organised by the Moore Street Preservation Trust.

SIPTU General Secretary, Joe Cunningham (second right) pictured at the launch of the Moore Street Preservation Trust plan for the battlefield site at Leinster House.

SIPTU General Secretary, Joe Cunningham said: “The Moore Street battlefield site, is the most important memorial we have to the foundation of the Irish State, yet it is currently at risk, like so many other parts of our capital, from vulture funds and developers.”

“The history of our own union, SIPTU, is intimately linked to this site. One of the signatories of the 1916 Proclamation, James Connolly, was not only Commandant General of the Irish Republic’s forces in Dublin but Acting General Secretary of our Union. …


SIPTU representatives have today (Monday, 24th May) welcomed confirmation from the Department of Health that radiographers, radiation therapists and other certain student health workers can apply to be vaccinators as part of the National Covid-19 vaccination programme.

SIPTU Health Division Organiser, Kevin Figgis, said: “For months, intensive efforts were made by SIPTU representatives to ensure our members who are qualified were afforded the opportunity to participate in the Covid-19 vaccination programme.

The original statutory instrument provided for nursing, medical practitioners and some other health professionals to apply to be vaccinators.

Our members then campaigned for the inclusion of radiographers, radiation therapists and certain student grades to be included in any revised statutory instrument.”

He added: “Our members argued that widening the eligibility of vaccinators, especially as more vaccines become available, is crucial for getting the…


Many workers in Ireland are afraid to form a union at work. They know that unions are the best way for workers to get a say in the workplace and to be treated with respect but they are afraid of victimisation by management if they unionise.

When workers have the opportunity to talk with a union official in their workplace about the pros and cons of forming a union, free from the fear of intimidation by management, they can make an informed decision about whether or not to unionise.

That’s what happened recently in Aonach Mhaca in Armagh and on May Day 2021 the management signed a union recognition and collective bargaining agreement with the Union Organiser Niall McNally on behalf of SIPTU.


Many workers in Ireland are afraid to form a union at work. They know that unions are the best way for workers to get a say in the workplace and to be treated with respect but they are afraid of victimisation by management if they unionise.

When workers have the opportunity to talk with a union official in their workplace about the pros and cons of forming a union, free from the fear of intimidation by management, they can make an informed decision about whether or not to unionise.

That’s what happened recently in Aonach Mhaca in Armagh and on May Day 2021 the management signed a union recognition and collective bargaining agreement with the Union Organiser Niall McNally on behalf of SIPTU.


The Government has asked the Low Pay Commission to come up with proposals to implement a living wage. This follows its commitment to introduce a living wage by 2025.

This is a welcome development. However, we should be cautious about what to expect.

First, the timeline to just the beginning of the implementation stage could be as long as 18 months. The Low Pay Commission will probably send its proposals to government by the end of the year.

The Government will deliberate on the proposals and engage in consultation with stakeholders. It is only then, after achieving a consensus, will they proceed. This will necessarily take time.

Second, a major issue is how to calculate a living wage. The Living Wage Technical Group, of which SIPTU is…


Low pay is widespread in Ireland and particularly widespread in the industries organised by the SIPTU Services Division.

Many workers in the hospitality, contract services, wholesale, retail, arts and entertainment industries are categorised as ‘low paid’, which can be classified as being paid below the living wage of €12.30 per hour.

We have a minimum wage of €10.20 per hour in Ireland, that is the minimum rate of pay that all workers should get under the law. The majority of workers on the minimum wage struggle to make ends meet.

Even during this current pandemic, members in some workplaces organised by the SIPTU Services Division have achieved, negotiated and agreed pay increases.

However, in many other cases, employers…


Responding to the announcement today, 24th April, of the results of the Citizens’ Assembly on Gender Equality, SIPTU members have welcomed its ‘priority recommendation’ on the establishment of a legal right to collective bargaining for workers in all sectors.

The Union has further welcomed the priority recommendations in relation to public funding for the early years education and care sector; improved pay and working conditions for care workers; an increase in the minimum wage to the living wage along with measures to help workers to balance care and work responsibilities.

SIPTU Deputy General Secretary, Ethel Buckley, highlighted the recommendation that the right of workers to engage in collective bargaining as a means of improving their wages, working conditions, rights and employment security be enshrined in Irish law.

She said: “SIPTU prioritised the introduction of the legal right to…


SIPTU representatives have today (Saturday, 17th April) welcomed an eleventh hour intervention of Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform, Michael McGrath to settle the long standing Community Employment (CE) supervisors pension dispute.

In correspondence issued to members of the Oireachtas today, Mr McGrath advised that an agreement had been reached between the Minister for Social Protection, Heather Humphries, and the Department of Public Expenditure and Reform to identify a possible resolution to this protracted struggle for pension justice.

SIPTU Sector Organiser, Jane Boushell, said: “Our members welcome the news that the Minister has finally seen the light and is not prepared to force these essential workers down the road of industrial action. The statement of intent from the Minister today absolutely vindicates our campaign for pension justice for CE supervisors. …


SIPTU economist, Michael Taft, has said that the projections in the Stability Programme Update (SPU) of continued ‘low-tax, low-spend’ policies by the Government will undermine the future growth prospects of the economy.

The SPU was published by the Department of Finance today (14th April) and sets out a range of economic policies to be pursued by the Government over the coming years.

Michael Taft said: “While today’s projections are based on a ‘no-change’ policy, the underlying path is to return to pre-pandemic normality, which is unsuitable to the challenges society faces over the next decade.

“On a positive note, the SPU suggests that, without any tax increases or spending cuts, the deficit will disappear by 2025. This should be the end of any talk about the need for austerity or fiscal contraction.

Liberty (@SIPTU)

Ireland’s Strongest Union. #ourSIPTU

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